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Global Energy System in Transition

The course focuses on an in-depth review and analysis of conditions and driving forces behind the transformation of the intertwined global energy system.

About This Course

Numerous factors influence the global energy system, which currently experiences intensive transformation. The course focuses on an in-depth review and analysis of conditions and driving forces behind the transformation of the intertwined global energy system. The course treats the function of energy systems with a strong focus on the relationship between the structure of the technical systems and their respective economical boundary conditions (pricing, market, etc.), as well as the function and transformation of energy markets.

The course consists of five modules with an in-depth review and analysis of the structure, functions and driving forces of the global energy system, as well as its transformation from technical, economic, political and ecological perspectives. It also includes an illustrative example of the development of biogas sector as a part of the global energy system transformation.

The course design and structure aim to give course participants the best possible conditions for active learning. It is based on series of video lectures supplemented by other visual and text materials, seminar activities, and individual project activity where students can apply new knowledge. The final version of the project is also the course examination.

The course is aimed for students interested in how energy system functions, what are its economic, political, climatological and technical conditions and boundaries, what is the difference in between transformation and transition, and also how to facilitate sustainable transition of the global energy system.

Learning Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the course, the learner is expected to be able to:

LO1. Analyze the structure and function of the global energy system regarding energy type, industrial and political structure

LO2. Discuss the main driving forces for the global energy system, compare technical and economic conditions and relationships between different energy types/energy markets

LO3. Interpret the technical, institutional and political mechanisms of the transformation of the energy system

LO4. Execute critical analysis of conditions and processes regarding future shifts in technology at company and policy level, related to the transformation of energy markets.

Expected Prior Knowledge

Prerequisites: general understanding of energy resources economics and management

Students should study all the suggested materials in the consequent order, pass all the course tests and be active in discussion on the course webpage. The individual project is the key element of the course and is mandatory in order to complete the course. The students are strongly advised to work continually with the individual project during the course to distribute the workload. The students also need to dedicate some of the course time to reviewing peers writing.

Course Instructors

Course Staff Image #1

Vladimir Kutcherov

Vladimir Kutcherov is an Assistant Professor at the Department of Energy Technology at the Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm). He is doctor of science (in physics and mathematics). His main research interests deal with the problem of the origin of hydrocarbons and oil and transformation of the global energy system. Prof. Kutcherov and his international collaborators have published a set of papers in PNAS, Nature Geoscience, Review of Geophysics.

Course Staff Image #2

Maria Morgunova

Maria Morgunova is a PhD student at KTH Royal Institute of Technology (Stockholm, Sweden), Department of Industrial Economics and Management, Division of Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics. Maria holds Degree of Licentiate of Engineering (KTH, May 2015) and PhD in International Economics (Gubkin Russian State University of Oil and Gas, Moscow, 2018). Her key research interests are conventional and unconventional energy resources, energy markets and systems in transition, electricity markets, digitalization, energy geoeconomics and geopolitics, renewable energy, Arctic region, offshore technology, decentralized and remoted energy supply, system analysis, industrial dynamics, socio-technical systems.

ECTS Credits

3 ECTS

Course Content and Structure

The course consists of five modules with an in-depth review and analysis of the structure, functions and driving forces of the global energy system, as well as its transformation from technical, economic, political and ecological perspectives. It also includes an illustrative example of the development of biogas sector as a part of the global energy system transformation.

The course design and structure aim to give course participants the best possible conditions for active learning. It is based on series of video lectures supplemented by other visual and text materials, seminar activities, and individual project activity where students can apply new knowledge. The final version of the project is also the course examination.

Assessment Methods and Weighting Scheme

the learners will be assessed through:

  • Formative assessment, including progress tests, 20%
  • Final examination (individual project), 80%

Recommended Readings and Other Learning Resources and Tools

Bijker, W.E., Hughes, T.P., Pinch, T., 1987. The Social construction of technological systems. Publisher: Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Dahmén, E., 1988. ‘Development blocks’ in industrial economics, Scandinavian Economic History. Review, 36:1, 3-14, DOI: 10.1080/03585522.1988.10408102

Geels F.W., Kemp R., 2007. Dynamics in socio-technical systems: Typology of change processes, Technology in Society 29, 441–455.

Geels F.W., 2014. Regime Resistance against Low-Carbon Transitions: Introducing Politics and Power into the Multi-Level Perspective, Theory, Culture and Society 2014, Vol. 31(5) 21–40 Special Issue: Energy and Society. 21-40 pp. DOI: 10.1177/0263276414531627

Morgunova, M., Kutcherov, V., 2016. Structural Change in Petroleum Industry. Chapter 10 in: A Dynamic Mind: Perspectives on Industrial Dynamics in Honour of Staffan Laestadius, Edited by Blomkvist P. and Johansson P. Division of Sustainability and Industrial Dynamics, INDEK, KTH, p. 249-275.

Language of Instruction

English

Frequently Asked Questions


What is a flipped course?

The flipped course includes learning activities to be executed before-class, in-class, and after class, where a part of workload for preparation for the in-class activities should be done individually. In-class activities include active learning elements in a group space, including case solving, discussions and similar. After class activities include assessments and assignments.

What are the course requirements?

Students should study all the suggested materials in the consequent order, pass all the course tests and be active in discussion on the course webpage. The individual project is the key element of the course and is mandatory in order to complete the course.

How should I manage my learning time?

The students are strongly advised to work continually with the individual project during the course to distribute the workload.

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